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, have diabetes and are on medicare, call now and we'll send you a free meter. it offers alternate site testing, so you can test on your arm. no more pricking your fingers. so it's less painful. it makes a big difference. and to make it even less painful, the cost of your diabetes testing supplies may be covered by medicare. join over a million others who have chosen liberty medical. call now and get your free meter. plus, for a limited time, get a free cookbook when you join. call t number on your screen. >>> mr. president, a point of clarification, what is in the better solutions book are all the legislative proposals -- >> i understand that. i've actually read your bills. >> -- throughout 2009. >> i understand that. >> rest assured the summary document you received is backed up by precisely the kind of detailed legislation that speaker pelosi and your administration have been busy ignoring for 12 months. >> mike, hold on, hold on a second. [ applause ] >> no, no, no, no. hold on a second, guys. you know, mike, i've read your legislation. i mean, i take a look at this stuff. and the g
insurance plans pay under part d of medicare for prescription drugs. they are taking advantage of their purchasing power. and we're relying on private insurers committee are' competition in part d of medicare, it isn't as effective as the v.a. which does take advantage of its market power. let me just talk for a moment on a private insurance. we rely on private insurance here. it's for-profit insurance. i think it leads to much higher health care costs. private insurers, obviously by definition, they have to make a profit. in addition to that they engage in marketing, they also engage in what we call medical understood writing, they have to hire a lot of actuaries to make sure that they're not taking on people who are too expensive. these are all very costly things. so that raises the price of private insurance. in addition, as i said, they don't have as much bargaining power so they also can't keep their prices low by taking advantage of the consolidated power that i'm talking about. so you might ask, why do we allow private insurance to have quasi-monopoly and the answer is t
it doesn't cover r can cost you some money. that's why you should consider... an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. it can help cover some of what medicare doesn't... in out-of-pocket expenses. call now for this free information kit... and edicare guide., if you're turning 65 or you're already on medicare, you should know about this card; it's the only one of its kind... that carries the aarp name -- see if it's right for you. you hoose your doctor. you choose your hospital. there are o networks and no.referrals needed. save up to thousands of dollars... on potential out-of-pocket expenses... with an aarp medicare .supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. call now for your free information kit... how ou ould start saving. assistance getting around their homes. there is a medicare benefit that may qualify you for a new power chair or scooter at little to no cost to you. stay tuned for this important medicare benefit information and free scooter guarantee. imagine... one scooter or power chair that c
. that's why you should consider... an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. it can help cover some of what medicare doesn't... so you could save up to thousands of dollars... in out-of-pocket expenses. call now for this free information kit... and medicare guide. if you're turning 65 or you're already on medicare, you should know about this card; it's the only one of its kind... that carries the aarp name -- see if it's right for you. you choose your doctor. you choose your hospital. there are no networks and no referrals needed. help protect yourself from some of what medicare doesn't cover. save up to thousands of dollars... on potential out-of-pocket expenses... with an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. call now for your free information kit... and medicare guide and find out... how you could start saving. >>> in the long sweep of american history, there are moments for each elected public official to step aside and let someone else step up. this is my moment to step asi
. in 2002 under the employee initiative the centers for medicare and medicaid services began publicly reporting quality information on nursing-home nationally on their web site. this was followed a year later by a similar effort in the home health arena. simultaneously there have been demonstration products by medicare in home house and skilled nursing facilities. state medicaid agencies have begun experimenting with a for performance in the nursing-home setting. the question is how these current market-based reforms address these broad goals of long-term care. in theory these reforms are perfectly compatible with these goals of improving quality of life and reducing fragmentation and increasing community-based services but there are several key attributes of these market-based reforms that may limit their effectiveness in this regard. the first limitation is current market-based reforms tend to rely on narrowly defined clinical quality measures. this tends to reinforce a medical model of care which pays more attention to clinical quality than issues related to quality of life and a c
but clearly with a body in medicare 55 and older you're going to pick up two or 3 million more. now you've got the program operated by opm. you will have a body in there of probably 7 million people. there's a provision most haven't focused on which is the state can set up a separate program for people, government-run, between 133% of poverty and 300% of poverty. i know a number of states will essentially do that and then finally, in all probability the exchanges are going to be run by states. so as the system comes forward you've got a bigger medicare and bigger medicaid that fixed rates, other components which are going to have negotiating rates. the bad news it's going to take four or five years to get this up and operating so i'm not sure there's going to be a lot of changes. but we have to start thinking how we bring this together. it may well be medicare and medicaid are dictating rates for the other groups that in fact negotiate. >> if we take that is the presumption we are going to see something, bill, i would like you to respond to what we are talking about here. but there's also the
why they would endorse a bill offering huge kits to medicare. these private plans offer seniors an alternative to medicare that often includes extra medical coverage like dental and vision care. >> i recognize the gentleman from georgia. >> reporter: georgia republican phil gingrey thinks he knows why. >> seniors are back into medicare fee for service, the more opportunity aarp has to get royalties from the sale of the medi gap policies. >> reporter: he says those seniors force the out of medicare advantage would have to buy supplemental insurance, like medi gap. for insurers like the aarp and its partner, united health care, that means a much higher profit margin. >> they have to purchase a medi gap policy, and oh, guess what? aarp has 30% of that. >> you should know about this card. >> reporter: it's a fact not lost on its member. >> aarp is about insurance. people need to know that. aarp is not out there to help you, it's to take your money and put it in their pocket. >> reporter: the aarp insists this is not true. so your lobbyists haven't lobbied to leave untouched. edigap?
for taking my call. the so-called reduction in medicare that the republicans more or less talk about on a regular basis is really -- is it information or misinformation about the program, either the senate or the house of representatives bill, are they going to really reduce the amount of money into medicare to pay for this plan? and also the public option, why is it that they are not wanting to really fight for the public option? it seems to me that that would be a good way to go and if people are purchasing insurance, you know, they're responsible for reading the policy and knowing what coverage they have and, you know, it's just like taking out a loan. if you don't read the fine print and you sign on the dotted line, you're responsible. because it's a contract. andity think the republicans are just fear mongering and trying to kill the bill simply because of the input of the lobbyists from the insurance, you know, the big corporations. host: thanks for your call. guest: a comment on the medicare question briefly. the pieces in the health legislation that would reduce costs under m
a grant funded by the national institute on aging to examine the -- examined the impact of medicare part de on medicare -- on nursing home residents. she also has a steady among cancer patients. that funding is provided by the national cancer institute and the department of veteran affairs. we're happy to have her here to speak about her article. we also have david stevenson whose recent work has focused on a range of topics in that sector, including long-term care financing options, the rising use of hospice care, and so on. we are delighted to have him speaking on the and assisted care -- on the assisted care piece. mary jane koren manages the commonwealth fund at the harvard program. she is an internist. she was vice president of the leslie samuels foundation in new york city prior to joining commonwealth. she began her career in geriatrics where she started a fellowship program and was the assistant medical director for the home health care agency. she has had plenty of experience in the real world. she is had plenty of experience in the real world delivery of these services. let's w
medicare benefit that, with private insurance, may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen... your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. hi i'm dan weston. we're experts at getting you the scooter or power chair you need. in fact, if we pre-qualify you for medicare reimbursement and medicare denies your claim, we'll give you your new power chair or scooter free. i didn't pay a penny out of pocket for my power chair. with help from the scooter store, medicare and my insurance covered it all. call the scooter store for free information today. call the number on your screen for free information. >> get ready for a double dip recession this year. if the democrats get their way, that's the warning from the president of the chamber of commerce this week. and jonathan says the new tax in the health care bill just guaranteed it. why do you say that? >> well, when you come right down to it, cheryl. the essence of this health care reform is taxing productive investment productivity for redistribution in a public entitlement program
to more commons. for example, with the healthcare, it is medicare and medicaid going bankrupt. if you brought in as the private insurers are able to jury began bring in healthy individuals to medicare -- are able to bring in and cherry pick healthy individuals -- perhaps a sliding scale -- it could bring healthy individuals paying full premiums into medicare to balance out the expenses we have now to pay for 65 and over. as you get older more medical bills. i would be interested to see c- span have some accountant or actuarial come in to run the numbers that exist for the private health insurers and have them make their profits. how to make medicare at a fee. host: banks, we will go at this point because we will have an hour-long later on health care. today concerning the senate, your view, the independent line from anderson, indiana. caller: it is truly disgusting after the display of the health care fiasco you have seen. the conservative an element is tearing up the fabric of democracy. after watching the sonia sotomayor confirmation hearings you have a 99 white guys who question pe
: if you're over 65, have diabetes and are on medicare... vo: ...call now and we'll send you a free meter. vo: it offers alternate site testing, so you can test on your arm. no more pricking your fingers. so it's less painful. renee: it makes a big difference. vo: and to make it even less painful, the cost of your diabetes testing supplies may be covered by medicare. vo: join over a million others who have chosen liberty medical. vo: call now and receive a free accu-chek aviva meter. vo: plus, for a limited time, get a free cookbook when you join. end tag vo: call the number on your screen. he was no stranger to stardom and the gossip that came with it. "it's very easy for tabloids to grab onto that and say,'what's the best way we can spin this into a front page story? i know - kirk cameron goes off the religious deep end!' when in actualty it was nothing more than 17-year-old old kid finding something that was worth more tha >> welcome back, everybody. in 2010, americans are hoping the job outlook will be brighter, especially after two years of continuous layoffs, 7 million americans hav
- term liabilities is medicare, medicaid, and health care spending. nothing comes close. social security would probably fix the same way to and ronald reagan sat down together and could figure something out. that is manageable. medicare and medicaid are a massive problem down the road. that is going to be what our children have to worry about. paul's approach, i want to be careful to not simplify this because i know you have a lot of detail in your plan, but i understand it to say that we will provide doctors of some sort for current medicare recipients at the current level. 55 and over. there is a grandfathering in for future beneficiaries. i just want to point out that i have read it. the basic idea is that at some point, we hold medicare costs per recipient constant as a way of making sure that it does not go way out of black. i am sure there are some details -- we hold medicare costs per recipient constant as a way of making sure that it does not have things going out of wahack. it has to be reformed for the younger generations because it is going bankrupt. why not give people the sa
. with the passage of the medicare modernization act. exactly what they did. and that's -- as we know, that barely squeaked through. it was the famous three-hour vote. which is the other important point to make here. which is that no matter what anybody tells you what the rules are, they make up the rules as they go along. right? and so -- and particularly on the senate side. they can pretty much figure out a way, if they want to, to do what they want. so that said, what happened in 2003, there was not even support within the republican ranks to pass that legislation. there was a huge dispute over whether it was a massive new entitlement or whether it was privatization of medicare or whether that was good or bad, the whole bit. and there was some democratic support. but clearly the bulk of the caucus would not vote for it. what did they do? they kept at it. and they did -- a dark of night series of back room deals. >> and what about the budget? >> and no pay forings. and there's a lot you can do in this town if you aren't -- if you're going to pass a $400 billion plus benefit and not pay for it. i
to understand your meter. if you're over 65, have diabetes and are on medicare, call now and we'll send you a free meter. it offers alternate site testing, so you can test on your arm. no more pricking your fingers. so it's less painful. it makes a big difference. and to make it even less painful, the cost of your diabetes testing supplies may be covered by medicare. join over a million others who have chosen liberty medical. call now and get your free meter. plus, for a limited time, get a free cookbook when you join. call the number on your screen. >>> breaking news. a rocket attack in afghanistan targets a building slated to house the u.s. consulate. one rocket hit the building shattering windows. the two other explosions happened nearby. fortunately no one was hurt. just last month the u.s. ambassador signed an agreement to lease the former five-star hotel in herat for the u.s. consulate. >>> michael steele is firing back at critics who want to put a muzzle on him. "the new york times" reports some donors aren't giving money to the rnc because of michael steele. >> if you don't want me
medicare recipients at the current level -- >> no. >> no? 55 -- well, no, i understand. i mean, there's a grandfathering in. just for future agabeneficiarie. i want to make sure i'm not unfair to your proposal but point out i read it. the basic idea would be at some point we hold medicare cost percipient constant as a way of making sure that doesn't go way out of whack. >> a blend of inflation and health inflation. the point of our plan is, because medicare, as you know, is a $38 trillion unfunded liability. it has to be reformed for younger generations because it won't exist because it's going bankrupt. the prepgs of our idea is, why not give people the same kind of health care plan we here have in congress? that's the kind of reform we're proposing for medicare. >> look, look, as i said before this is an entirely legitimate proposal. the problem is twofold. one is that depending on how it's structured if recipients are suddenly getting a plan that has their reimbursement rates going like this but health care costs are still going up like that then over time the way we're saving mone
done more with cost containment or fixing medicare which is already broken instead of just expanding it. there's something in between doing nothing and just doing this bill, isn't there? >> of course, there's always something in between. and i think that the president spent a good deal of time trying to find a bipartisan solution, dealing with senator collins, senator grassley. come on, he spent the whole summer. i mean, i was pulling my hair out by the end of july or the beginning of august that they were still in this kind of scrum with the republican members on the finance committee. >> do you remember hanging on every word grassley said, every word snowe said? >> not really. >> collins? >> not really. >> a long time ago. >> so i think they tried. and at the end of the day, the republicans made a decision that they were just going to be at opposition and hoped that as rush limbaugh famously said, that the president would fail. >> oh, okay. all right. >> that's their political strategy. >> let me ask you -- well, because they could honestly believe that some of these things aren't the
to lower the costs of medicare and medicaid and it will not cost anybody anything. that is great politics, it is just not true. so there has got to be some test of realism in any of thesexd proposals, mine included. i have to hold myself accountable and guarantee the american people will hold me accountable if what i am selling does not actually deliver. >> mr. president, a point of clarification. what is in the better solutions book are all the legislative proposals that were offered. >> i understand that. i have actually read your bills. >> through 2009. >> i a understand. -- i understand. >> the summary document you receive this backed up by precisely the kind of detailed legislation that speaker pelosi android restoration have been busy ignoring for 12 months. >> i have read your legislation. i take a look at this stuff and the good ideas we take. here is the thing that all this have to be mindful of. it cannot be all nothing, one way or the other. would the mean by that is thisÑi if we put together a stimulus package in which a third of it are tax cuts that normally you'd support an
unusual because it addresses so little spending, nondiscretionary spending, medicare, medication and social security and defense off the table on the freeze. it is a start and evan bayh from indiana is encouraged by that. senator, good to have you, thanks for coming. >> good to be with you, neil. >> this start, a lot of folks in the other party have said it's not enough of one. in fact it's a joke. the savings we're talking about over ten years, $250 billion, might seem like a lot but in the scheme of spending, closing in on $20 trillion, chump change. what do you say? >> well, i think you've got to have merit to both arguments. it's a significant start and neil you know that by the fact the president is roundly criticized by some segments to want more spending and debt. $250 billion is a important down payment but we need more. there are other parts of the budget this does not touch. that's why which tried to have a long-term commission to wrestle with those problems but the fact the president is willing to step up and freeze this rapidly growing parts of the boing and it's back
been writing think there is not enough reform in it and they begin with medicare. trying to pay for a lot of this by cutting medicare is not the solution. you've got to rearrange medicare, there was a story in the new york times this past week what happens at ucla where they extend life no matter what the cost is, and it becomes well beyond what is reasonable medically. >> as we get older. >> get older. but for example, at ucla medical center, they spend $92,000 i think is the number on the last two years of a life at portland, oregon north of there they spend $52,000 because they have better controls on medicare. so until you begin to pay for value and performance, then health care reform is not going to work despite all of the pieces. >> here we are at the dawn of a new decade. a lot of talk about the old decade. there was a cartoon that caught my eye that shows uncle sam trying to return the first decade of this century to the returns and exchanges bureau and the lady says i'm sorry, sir, we have rules against returning entire decades. but doris, a lot made about the notion o
that could improve your mobility and your life. one medicare benefit that, with private insurance, may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen... your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. hi i'm dan weston. we're experts at getting you the scooter or power chair you need. in fact, if we pre-qualify you for medicare reimbursement and medicare denies your claim, we'll give you your new power chair or scooter free. i didn't pay a penny out of pocket for my power chair. with help from the scooter store, medicare and my insurance covered it all. call the scooter store for free information today. call the number on your screen for free information. >> we could read that all men were created equal and they were endowed by their creator with certain alienable rights and among these were life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness i knew it meant me! >>> newmakers, analysts were out on the sunday morning talk show and only one gets the last word and that honor goes to the man you heard speaking right there 20 years ago. governor wil
this proposed 1% medicare payroll tax hike to fund the obama health care plan by including investments, like capital gains and dividends rather than simply wages. now, the wage hike's bad enough. obama care is bad enough. but applying this to investment simply raises the cost of capital, lowers the return on risk taking, and damages prospects for economic recovery growth. what is team obama thinking. the new year tax attack. i've never seen anything so dumb. i'm not surprised stocks sold off today, especially the bank stocks. and i've got to tell you, if these tax hikes actually get through the congress and the white house in the weeks ahead, the stock market is going to sag, no matter how good fourth-quarter profits come in. you cannot tax your way to prosperity. did i say dumb policy? that is my take. extremely dumb policy. now, i want to get some reaction on this point from our guests. we have ssht director for tax and budget policy at the center for american progress, michael lyndon. we also have the "wall street journal's" steve moore. michael lyndon, because i believe in fairness and o
and your life. one medicare benefit that, with private insurance, may entitle you to pay little to nothing to own it. one company that can make it all happen... your power chair will be paid in full. the scooter store. hi i'm dan weston. we're experts at getting you the scooter or power chair you need. in fact, if we pre-qualify you for medicare reimbursement and medicare denies your claim, we'll give you your new power chair or scooter free. i didn't pay a penny out of pocket for my power chair. with help from the scooter store, medicare and my insurance covered it all. call the scooter store for free information today. call the number on your screen for free information. >>> lightning round now with anne, jessica, and dana. watch closely, david gregory of "motor t meet the press. >> we need to move the state forward and bring in both of the parties together and to get our infrastructure. the water infrastructure tax passed. just a little earthquake. see, in california when there is a noise, earthquakes happen all the time. >> now, we have to be careful because there was an earthquake off
medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. it can help cover some of what medicare doesn't... so you could save up to thousands of dollars... in out-of-pocket expenses. call now for this free information kit... and medicare guide. if you're turning 65 or you're already on medicare, you should know about this card; it's the only one of its kind... that carries the aarp name -- see if it's right for you. you choose your doctor. you choose your hospital. there are no networks and no referrals needed. help protect yourself from some of what medicare doesn't cover. save up to thousands of dollars... on potential out-of-pocket expenses... with an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by united healthcare insurance company. call now for your free information kit... and medicare guide and find out... how you could start saving. that's a lot of people. to prove my point i asked gary here to friend request all of them. how's it coming, gary? [ ding ] we got one! that's good. oh! ah, wow. [ dinging continues ] becoming a popular guy. [ rattli
is being talked about, is extending the medicare payroll tax, not just extending the tax, but extending it to investment income. what that would allow you to do, you could lose the surtax that i mentioned. you could reduce the level or the impact of that cat cadillac tax on high cost insurance plans, which is very important to labor unions chor opposed to that tax even though the white house is for it. >> the house doesn't want to be a wall nflower. they only won by 1 in the house. don't think we're going to roll over for everything you tell us to do in the senate. i and i just wonder whether that starts getting louder. >> i've heard that argument from weinor and others. the house doesn't want to completely get rolled, but they're going to mostly get rolled. >> because they're the -- what is it in london? they're the commoners, i guess. >> they're in steerage on the titanic. >> they're not the senators -- >> john kerry, those types. >> we've modified. >> they're scrappers. >> it's sort ooh like on this show, joe is the house of representatives and becky and carl is the senate. >> becky
the center for medicare education, the better jobs better care of national program. she was a political appointee during the clinton administration, serving in the department of health and human services. she also was assistant secretary for aging in 1997. she is been a senior researcher for health services research and project hope center for health affairs previously. to begin, but welcome to the podium. let's welcome him to the podium. >> people tend to view long-term care through a particular lands, depending on what they are interested in. some people focus on specific federal programs. they might focus on quality issues or workforce issues. they also tend to focus on specific populations of elderly. as carol levine said in her article, the whole is often eclipsed by a separate part. this article is an attempt to paint a picture of that hole, although i realize there are plenty of my own biases in it. we include people receiving long-term care from public programs, from family members, from private paid workers, whether they live in the community or institutions, whether they are e
for yourself, you're employed, retired, or medicare-eligible, call now for free information. and get what you need to make health care decisions... that work for you. you don't even have to be an aarp member to call. all you have to do is be yourself. and, if you have any questions about medicare, call today and get your free copy of "medicare made clear," by unitedhealth educational publishing group. it will help you better understand all your choices. so don't wait. call today for your free guide.
like social security and medicare. but it was a proposal that both republicans and democrats, i hoped, would like enough to move forward. the spending problem we have, mr. president, is like a cancer, and this chamber refuses to seek any treatment. and while i did not like the proposal completely, i at least supported it because i knew we needed to do something. our spending is out of control. we have a $12 trillion debt. the deficit of last year was was $1.4 trillion, more than the past four years in the bush administration combined. now, i am new to this chamber, so the bizarre still seems bizarre to me, and perhaps the longer you're here, bizarre starts to seem normal. but we cannot spend more than we take in. we cannot continue to amass a debt that our children are going to have to pay for. right now, we have to go borrow money from countries like china because we can no longer raid social security and medicare because those programs now need those dollars to be paid out. but at some point, this country is going to have to pay the piper. at some point, we're going to have to drama
on medicare, who are looking at a medicare trust fund that's going to be insolvent too soon. it's important to our economy as a whole if we're going to be competitive. >> the devil in the details? >> sure. >> is it too expensive as it is now and do you think it has a chance of ending up on his desk? >> well, i voted for the bill that passed out of the senate. it was fully paid for and it helped to reduce our deficit over the next ten years. it's going to be too expensive if we don't address this issue. and, you know, i think we'll know in the coming weeks whether we're going to be able to get a bill through. >> and one of the things the president talked about, time and again -- he really lamb entered the partisan divide in washington. i want to play what jeb bush had to say, senator. >> it's one thing to give a good speech. the other thing is to invite people who don't agree exactly with your point of view to build consensus. if the president chose leadership in that regard, leaders of the republican party and democratic party will have to follow. >> given the current political divide, the
that will bring down premiums, bring down the deficit, cover the uninsured, strengthen medicare for seniors, let me know. >> larry: talking tough on terrorism. >> hundreds of al qaeda's fighters and affiliates have been captured or killed. >> larry: what did the president need to say and did he say it? is it going to make any difference? that's all next on a special edition. of "larry king live". well, the state of the union address is over. and the analysis is now continue as they do with us. if you missed any part of the speech, it will be repeated in one hour. wolf blitzer, john king and candy crowley in this segment, then senator john mccain, then a panel of pundits, as they say. wolf, you've seen a lot of these. how do you score this one? >> if you like a lot of wonkish detail, as i do, the president went through a lot of that. so i was just happy that he got into those kinds of specifics. he made his case. and i loved watching it. i'm sure you did, too, larry, a lot of our viewers did, the democrats jumping up, applauding, standing ovations, the republicans sort of sitting quietly. you saw
that he's already increased 24%. >> wait a minute -- >> social security, medicare, medicaid? that's a big budget, though. >> what about the mountain of debt that obama inherited? >> well, but he -- >> it twz a true mountain, was it not? >> he misstated it on wednesday night. he said a trillion dollar deficit. in 2007, the deficit was at $170 billion. over 2008 when bush was still president it exploded to 450 billion because of t.a.r.p. and the recession. that didn't give the president an excuse to blow it up to over $1.3 trillion. >> excuse me. >> no, we want to point out that the t.a.r.p. legislation is bush's legislation. >> yes, but bush only spent $350 billion of the $700 t to k >> with all due dove reness of separation of powers, last week the supreme court reversed a century of law that i believe will open the floodgates for special interests, including foreign corpor our election. [ applause ] >> question. was this political oratory okay or was this demagoguic and dangerous? i ask you, eleanor? >> liberals loved it. this supreme court decision overruled 100 years of legal doctrin
trillions in debt for our children to pay. >> obama care. >> it will raise taxes. it will hurt medicare. it will destroy jobs and run our nation deeper into debt. >> universal health care? >> i think it's important for everyone to get some form of health care so to offer a basic plan for everybody, i think,important. >> new breed republican. >> maybe there's a new breed of republican coming to washington. maybe people will finally look at somebody who's not beholden to the special interests of the party and who will know, just to solve problems. >> question. should this be gloat time for republicans, pat bu cannen? >> it should be in a way rejoice john because what this guy did is i'll go to washington and put a stake right through obama care. he shot up in one month 37 points. 36 hours after he won that election, nancy pelosi said health care can't get through the house, and obama gave up on it. you've got a populous conservative movement that is like a rocket. if the republican party can attach it to itself it can pick up a plethora of seats. obama, a good politician recognized it, j
if you're on medicare, the cost of your diabetes testing supplies as well as your prescription drugs may be covered. liberty takes care of all the paperwork with medicare and sends the prescription forms directly to your doctor for approval. then, on your schedule, packs up this box and sends it right to your door with no charge for shipping. and liberty assures you have everything you need to manage your diabetes, including most brand name meters. call now and we'll send you a free meter. plus, a free cookbook when you join. call liberty. they can help you live a better life. call the number on your screen. >>> welcome back. u.p.s. raising its fourth quarter guidance today. that was an important story on the day. it was based on successful cost-cutting and better than expected performance in both domestic and international businesses at u.p.s. it's a good sign for anxious investors, certainly, before earnings season kicks off, but is the market overly optimistic for the fourth quarter? joining me now to talk about that and the earnings period overall is john fisher, portfolio manager at
, you look at healthcare and they cut a half a trillion from medicare n massachusetts we have 98% of other people insured, why we would county medicare half a trillion, have longer lines, less coverage and subsidize other states. et cetera -- it's not good for massachusetts and people have lost faith in the process. there's no transparency and in in addition to homeland security it's resonating with the residents of massachusetts. >> bring me up speed. were you involved in then governor mitt romney's moves to establish state care, what was called state care, but to broaden healthcare coverage for all in massachusetts? >> i voted on it. it was a bipartisan evident. we were paying almost a billion dollar to the hospitals. >> the argument was that you contributed to something that now you're against? >> that's not true. they're interest different programs, what we have is a free market enterprise, providing insurance to people in massachusetts. ed the plans in washington are one size fits all that will cost almost a trillion plus dollars and raise taxes when we don't need it. why pa
. we do not need what is being pushed in washington on massachusetts, spending $500 million on medicare? we know we need to reform and that is something we're going to be doing very shortly. to think that we need of one size fits all plan from congress, coming down here and hurting what we have? that is one of the differences between martha coakley and i. at a time when we just do not needed. i would propose going and allowing states to do this individually with the government incentivizing it. we can export what we have done and show them how to do it. i am looking forward to be the party -- the 41st vote and get that plan back to the drawing board. >> thank you for hosting us here this evening. i would be proud to be the 60th vote to make sure that we need health care reform that was so badly need. we have taken the lead here in massachusetts, and now we are attacking the cost to provide competition and transparency to bring the costs down. we spent $2.60 trillion on health care in this country. we do not get our money. we do not have transparent terry -- transparency in competition.
that medicare does not go bankrupt and there's a way to charge people 5.25% and up, allow us to buy into medicare and pay the full premium. there's a lot of healthy people to pay into medicare and it would counter balance all the older people using medicare and gove)nment insurance, health insurance funds. harry reed let us down on the healthcare reform and there's way - europeans have a gas tax to pay for healthcare. we use 84 million barrels of oil in this country a day. we could pay for healthcare by putting a dollar a tax on gasoline and harry reed let us down by not walking the walk. count less hours on that issue as well. app)eciate your comments on senator reid. roy, republican line. you're on c-span. good morning. caller: i love my country and all it's people so much. i'm so tired of groups being pitted against each other. this is simple when you think about it. the people who support god given free will verses those that don't and you call in and they tell you what you should and shouldn't talk about. that makes my point right there. sir, you can talk about anything you wa
premiums, bring down the deficit, cover the uninsured, strengthen medicare for seniors, and stop insurance company abuses, let me know. let me know. let me know. i'm eager to see it. here's what i ask congress, though. don't walk away from reform. not now. not when we are so close. let us find a way to come together and finish the job for the american people. let's get it done. let's get it done. now, even as health care reform would reduce our deficit, it's not enough to dig us out of a massive fiscal hole in which we find ourselves. it's a challenge that makes all others that much harder to solve. and one that's been subject to a lot of political posturing. so let me start the discussion of government spending by setting the record straight. at the beginning of the last decade, the year 2000, america had a budget surplus of over $200 billion. by the time i took office, we had a one-year deficit of over $1 trillion and projected deficits of $8 trillion over the next decade. most of this was the result of not paying for two wars, two tax cuts, and an expensive prescription drug program. on
values of the democratic party, which include social security, medicare, medicaid, are exempt, and we understand that's the case, certainly i agree that dennis has a point. certainly our caucus will review an awful lot of this with interest. i think if the president uses a scalpel, if he is not going after this with a hatchet, that that's an approach that can work. and we're happy to roll up our sleeves and work alongside the president. >> mr. kucinich, congressman, the deficit, the current fiscal year which ends at the end of september, is pretty high by any standards. of course, this president said it was well over $1 trillion in deficit. do we run the risk of rolling deficit after deficit and scaring the hell out of the money markets to the point we can't borrow any money for the chinese anymore? the dollar begins to shrink. isn't there a danger even as a liberal, aren't you worried about a shrinking dollar? or not? >> well, we should be concerned about the deaf silt. the question is, how do you deal with the deficit? and what most economists, who want to look at deficit reduction
all hated the bank bailout and what he was doing in medicare and the grand scale of the talking points for his party and making a come back in the midterm election saying we know what we're doing we know there are obstacles, we know it wasn't all going to be easy based on hope so here is where we're trying to go. in that sense yes, i think it was very much a clintonesque laundry list of ideas fothe mid terms. >> charlie: any new ideas? >> no. i think really the only thing that was surprising to me in this speech was the occasional bark that obama was making saying there are people who disregard the overwhelming scientific evidence of climate change or whatever. so i don't think there was much that was new in the content but it was we are establishing yes we are confident in what we are doing. we have a plan we're doing this step by step by step as oppose to this chaos you've been inferring in the last month in news coverage. >> i think charlie also if i may there was one new thing that wasn't there which you may, if you were on the left of the democratic party, have wanted to hear. wh
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